Shravan Vasishth

Professor, Dept. of Linguistics, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)331-977-2950 | Fax: - 2087 | Email: vasishth squiggle uni minus potsdam dot de
Orcid ID, google scholar, github, statistics blog, vasishth lab blog
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Current research

We routinely release data and code with published papers (see below); we have been systematically working towards achieving open access to our research since 2010. I signed the research transparency commitment on Sept 9 2015.

We also contribute to the list of publicly available psycholinguistics data-sets.

  1. Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis: In Vasishth et al 2013, we were the first to apply Bayesian random-effects meta analysis to synthesizing evidence in sentence comprehension research. Also see Jäger et al 2016, and my MSc thesis (2015), A meta-analysis of relative clause processing in Mandarin Chinese using bias modelling. I feel that meta-analysis should be a standard part of a literature review in psycholinguistics. Granted that publications represent a biased view of the facts, and granted that meta-analysis therefore can only give a biased view of the facts; but the literature is what it is. Until the fields of psychology and linguistics decide to clean up their experimental and analytical approaches, we have to work with what we think we know about psycholinguistic phenomena. Conditional on the facts being correct, meta-analysis is a very valuable tool for evidence synthesis, and should be a standard part of literature reviews.
  2. Computational modeling of interference processes in sentence processing In Engelmann et al 2016, we present a computational model of cue-based retrieval that extends the Lewis and Vasishth 2005 (LV05) model. We implement two novel constructs, distractor prominence and cue confusion, in order to explain published data that the LV05 model cannot account for. This extended model makes novel predictions that can be tested in future work on interference.
  3. Eye movements and parsing Felix Engelmann's PhD dissertation includes a computational model that integrates an explicit model of eye-movement control and sentence parsing cost. This work builds on the Lewis and Vasishth 2005 paper and is the only computationally implemented model of cue-based retrieval interference in sentence comprehension. The code is freely available here.
    • Felix Engelmann, Shravan Vasishth, Ralf Engbert, and Reinhold Kliegl. A framework for modeling the interaction of syntactic processing and eye movement control. Topics in Cognitive Science, 5(3):452-474, 2013. [ pdf ]
  4. Sentence comprehension in aphasia Our recent work on sentence processing includes a computational model of visual world (sentence-picture matching) processing in individuals with aphasia and unimpaired controls:
    • Umesh Patil, Sandra Hanne, Frank Burchert, Ria De Bleser, and Shravan Vasishth. A computational evaluation of sentence comprehension deficits in aphasia. Cognitive Science, 40:5–50, 2016. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
  5. Prediction and retrieval processes We have investigated the interaction of expectation-based processing and retrieval-based cost. For example, here is suggestive empirical evidence that increasing entropy may be able to explain locality effects in argument-verb dependency resolution, and that the underlying cause for an increase in entropy may be forgetting processes in working memory:
    • Molood Sadat Safavi, Samar Husain, and Shravan Vasishth. Dependency resolution difficulty increases with distance in Persian separable complex predicates: Implications for expectation and memory-based accounts. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 2016. Special Issue on Encoding and Navigating Linguistic Representations in Memory. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
  6. Underspecification and individual differences in sentence comprehension Our recent work presents a computational model of underspecification processes in sentence comprehension:
    • Pavel Logačev and Shravan Vasishth. Understanding underspecification: A comparison of two computational implementations. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69(5):996-1012, 2016. [ DOI | pdf ]
  7. Applications of statistical methods We have been using Bayesian data analysis in psycholinguistics since 2013; we use the modern probabilistic programming languages Stan and JAGS for data analysis. We have also written several tutorial-style articles to help disseminate the latest tools that are now available for data analysis, and have also tried to provide accessible introductions to help non-statisticians develop a better understanding of statistical methodology.
    1. A meta-analysis of relative clause processing in Mandarin Chinese using bias modelling, MSc thesis (2015), Shravan Vasishth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, UK.
    2. Read my review of the MSc in Statistics taught at the School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield. I completed this MSc between Sept 2012 and June 2015. I also did a preparatory Graduate Certificate, between 2011 and 2012, which is reviewed here.
    3. Parsimonious Mixed Models, by Bates, Kliegl, Vasishth and Baayen. ArXiv preprint.
    4. Bayesian Linear Mixed Models using Stan: A tutorial for psychologists, linguists, and cognitive scientists; by Sorensen, Hohenstein, and Vasishth.
    5. Balancing Type I Error and Power in Linear Mixed Models, by Matuschek, Kliegl, Vasishth, Baayen, Bates. Accepted pending minor revisions, Journal of Memory and Language.
    6. The Cave of Shadows: Addressing the human factor with generalized additive mixed models by Baayen, Vasishth, Bates, and Kliegl. Accepted, Journal of Memory and Language.
    7. Statistical methods for linguistic research: Foundational Ideas - Part I, by Shravan Vasishth and Bruno Nicenboim. In Press, Language and Linguistics Compass.
    8. Statistical methods for linguistic research: Foundational Ideas - Part II, by Bruno Nicenboim and Shravan Vasishth. In Press, Language and Linguistics Compass.

research articles

published, accepted, in press
[1]
R. Harald Baayen, Shravan Vasishth, Reinhold Kliegl, and Douglas Bates. The Cave of Shadows: Addressing the human factor with generalized additive mixed models. Journal of Memory and Language, pages 206-234, 2017. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[2]
Lena A. Jäger, Felix Engelmann, and Shravan Vasishth. Similarity-based interference in sentence comprehension: Literature review and Bayesian meta-analysis. Journal of Memory and Language, 2017. Accepted. [ code | pdf ]
[3]
Gerrit Kentner and Shravan Vasishth. Prosodic focus marking in silent reading: Effects of discourse context and rhythm. 7(319), 2016. Frontiers in Psychology. [ DOI | pdf | http ]
[4]
Pavel Logačev and Shravan Vasishth. Understanding underspecification: A comparison of two computational implementations. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69(5):996-1012, 2016. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[5]
Hannes Matuschek, Reinhold Kliegl, Shravan Vasishth, R. Harald Baayen, and Douglas Bates. Balancing Type I Error and Power in Linear Mixed Models. Journal of Memory and Language, 2016. Accepted pending minor revisions. [ pdf ]
[6]
Paul Metzner, Titus von der Malsburg, Shravan Vasishth, and Frank Rösler. The importance of reading naturally: Evidence from combined recordings of eye movements and electric brain potentials. Cognitive Science, 2016. [ DOI ]
[7]
Bruno Nicenboim, Pavel Logačev, Carolina Gattei, and Shravan Vasishth. When high-capacity readers slow down and low-capacity readers speed up: Working memory differences in unbounded dependencies. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(280), 2016. Special Issue on Encoding and Navigating Linguistic Representations in Memory. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[8]
Bruno Nicenboim and Shravan Vasishth. Statistical methods for linguistic research: Foundational Ideas - Part II. Language and Linguistics Compass, 10:591-613, 2016. [ code | pdf ]
[9]
Dario Paape and Shravan Vasishth. Local coherence and preemptive digging-in effects in German. Language and Speech, 59:387-403, 2016. [ pdf ]
[10]
Umesh Patil, Sandra Hanne, Frank Burchert, Ria De Bleser, and Shravan Vasishth. A computational evaluation of sentence comprehension deficits in aphasia. Cognitive Science, 40:5–50, 2016. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[11]
Umesh Patil, Shravan Vasishth, and Richard L. Lewis. Retrieval interference in syntactic processing: The case of reflexive binding in English. Frontiers in Psychology, 2016. Special Issue on Encoding and Navigating Linguistic Representations in Memory. [ DOI | code ]
[12]
Molood Sadat Safavi, Samar Husain, and Shravan Vasishth. Dependency resolution difficulty increases with distance in Persian separable complex predicates: Implications for expectation and memory-based accounts. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 2016. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[13]
Tanner Sorensen, Sven Hohenstein, and Shravan Vasishth. Bayesian linear mixed models using Stan: A tutorial for psychologists, linguists, and cognitive scientists. Quantitative Methods for Psychology, 12(3):175-200, 2016. [ pdf | .html ]
[14]
Shravan Vasishth and Bruno Nicenboim. Statistical Methods for Linguistic Research: Foundational Ideas – Part I. Language and Linguistics Compass, 10(8):349-369, 2016. [ DOI | code | http ]
[15]
Stefan L. Frank, Thijs Trompenaars, and Shravan Vasishth. Cross-linguistic differences in processing double-embedded relative clauses: Working-memory constraints or language statistics? Cognitive Science, page n/a, 2015. [ code | pdf ]
[16]
Sandra Hanne, Frank Burchert, Ria De Bleser, and Shravan Vasishth. Sentence comprehension and morphological cues in aphasia: What eye-tracking reveals about integration and prediction. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 34:83-111, 2015. [ pdf ]
[17]
Sandra Hanne, Frank Burchert, and Shravan Vasishth. On the nature of the subject-object asymmetry in wh-question comprehension in aphasia: Evidence from eye-tracking. Aphasiology, 2015. [ pdf ]
[18]
Samar Husain, Shravan Vasishth, and Narayanan Srinivasan. Integration and prediction difficulty in Hindi sentence comprehension: Evidence from an eye-tracking corpus. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 8(2):1-12, 2015. [ pdf ]
[19]
Lena A. Jäger, Lena Benz, Jens Roeser, Brian W. Dillon, and Shravan Vasishth. Teasing apart retrieval and encoding interference in the processing of anaphors. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(506), 2015. [ DOI | pdf | http ]
[20]
Lena A. Jäger, Zhong Chen, Qiang Li, Chien-Jer Charles Lin, and Shravan Vasishth. The subject-relative advantage in Chinese: Evidence for expectation-based processing. Journal of Memory and Language, 79-80:97-120, 2015. [ DOI | .pdf ]
[21]
Lena A. Jäger, Felix Engelmann, and Shravan Vasishth. Retrieval interference in reflexive processing: Experimental evidence from Mandarin, and computational modeling. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(617), 2015. [ DOI | pdf ]
[22]
Pavel Logačev and Shravan Vasishth. A Multiple-Channel Model of Task-Dependent Ambiguity Resolution in Sentence Comprehension. Cognitive Science, 2015. [ code | pdf ]
[23]
Bruno Nicenboim, Shravan Vasishth, Reinhold Kliegl, Carolina Gattei, and Mariano Sigman. Working memory differences in long distance dependency resolution. Frontiers in Psychology, 2015. [ code | pdf | http ]
[24]
Titus von der Malsburg, Reinhold Kliegl, and Shravan Vasishth. Determinants of Scanpath Regularity in Reading. Cognitive Science, 39(7):1675-1703, 2015. [ DOI ]
[25]
Philip Hofmeister and Shravan Vasishth. Distinctiveness and encoding effects in online sentence comprehension. 5:1-13, 2014. Article 1237. [ DOI | code | pdf ]
[26]
Samar Husain, Shravan Vasishth, and Narayanan Srinivasan. Strong Expectations Cancel Locality Effects: Evidence from Hindi. PLoS ONE, 9(7):1-14, 2014. [ code | pdf ]
[27]
Paul Metzner, Titus von der Malsburg, Shravan Vasishth, and Frank Rösler. Brain responses to world-knowledge violations: A comparison of stimulus- and fixation-triggered event-related potentials and neural oscillations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 27(5):1017-1028, 2014. [ DOI | pdf ]
[28]
Shravan Vasishth, Zhong Chen, Qiang Li, and Gueilan Guo. Processing Chinese Relative Clauses: Evidence for the Subject-Relative Advantage. PLoS ONE, 8(10):1-14, 10 2013. [ code | pdf ]
[29]
Felix Engelmann, Shravan Vasishth, Ralf Engbert, and Reinhold Kliegl. A framework for modeling the interaction of syntactic processing and eye movement control. Topics in Cognitive Science, 5(3):452-474, 2013. [ pdf ]
[30]
Niloofar Keshtiari and Shravan Vasishth. Reactivation of antecedents by overt vs null pronouns: Evidence from Persian. 1(2):243-266, 2013. [ code | pdf ]
[31]
Kate McCurdy, Gerrit Kentner, and Shravan Vasishth. Implicit prosody and contextual bias in silent reading. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 6(2):1-17, 2013. [ code | pdf ]
[32]
Titus von der Malsburg and Shravan Vasishth. Scanpaths reveal syntactic underspecification and reanalysis strategies. Language and Cognitive Processes, 28(10):1545-1578, 2013.
[33]
Frank Burchert, Sandra Hanne, and Shravan Vasishth. Sentence comprehension disorders in aphasia: The concept of chance performance revisited. Aphasiology, 2012. [ pdf ]
[34]
Shravan Vasishth, Rukshin Shaher, and Narayanan Srinivasan. The role of clefting, word order and given-new ordering in sentence comprehension: Evidence from Hindi. Journal of South Asian Linguistics, 2012. [ code | pdf ]
[35]
Shravan Vasishth, Titus von der Malsburg, and Felix Engelmann. What eye movements can tell us about sentence comprehension. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, pages 125-134, 2012. [ pdf ]
[36]
Brian Bartek, Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth, and Mason Smith. In Search of On-line Locality Effects in Sentence Comprehension. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 37(5):1178-1198, 2011. [ code | pdf ]
[37]
Marisa F. Boston, John T. Hale, Shravan Vasishth, and Reinhold Kliegl. Parallel processing and sentence comprehension difficulty. Language and Cognitive Processes, 26(3):301-349, 2011. [ pdf ]
[38]
Zhong Chen, Lena Jäger, and Shravan Vasishth. How structure sensitive is the parser? Evidence from Mandarin Chinese. In Empirical approaches to linguistic theory: Studies of meaning and structure, Studies in Generative Grammar. Mouton de Gruyter, 2011. [ code | pdf ]
[39]
Heiner Drenhaus, Malte Zimmermann, and Shravan Vasishth. Exhaustiveness effects in clefts are not truth-functional. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 24:320-337, 2011. [ pdf ]
[40]
Sandra Hanne, Irina Sekerina, Shravan Vasishth, Frank Burchert, and Ria De Bleser. Chance in agrammatic sentence comprehension: What does it really mean? Evidence from Eye Movements of German Agrammatic Aphasics. Aphasiology, 25:221-244, 2011. [ pdf ]
[41]
Pavel Logačev and Shravan Vasishth. Case matching and conflicting bindings interference. In Peter de Swart and Monique Lamers, editors, Case, Word Order, and Prominence: Psycholinguistic and theoretical approaches to argument structure, volume 2 of Studies in Theoretical Psycholinguistics. Springer, 2011. [ .pdf ]
[42]
Shravan Vasishth. Integration and Prediction in Head-Final Structures. In Hiroko Yamashita, Yuki Hirose, and Jerry Packard, editors, Processing and Producing Head-Final Structure, Studies in Theoretical Psycholinguistics, pages 349-367. Springer, 2011. [ .pdf ]
[43]
Shravan Vasishth and Heiner Drenhaus. Locality in German. Dialogue and Discourse, 1:59-82, 2011. [ pdf ]
[44]
Shravan Vasishth, Katja Suckow, Richard L. Lewis, and Sabine Kern. Short-term forgetting in sentence comprehension: Crosslinguistic evidence from head-final structures. Language and Cognitive Processes, 25(4):533-567, 2011. [ code | pdf ]
[45]
Titus von der Malsburg and Shravan Vasishth. What is the scanpath signature of syntactic reanalysis? Journal of Memory and Language, 65:109-127, 2011. [ pdf ]
[46]
Sigrid Beck and Shravan Vasishth. Multiple Focus. Journal of Semantics, 2009. [ code | .pdf ]
[47]
Umesh Patil, Gerrit Kentner, Anja Gollrad, Frank Kügler, Caroline Féry, and Shravan Vasishth. Focus, word order and intonation in Hindi. Journal of South Asian Linguistics, 1(1):55-72, October 2008. [ .pdf ]
[48]
Marisa Ferrara Boston, John T. Hale, Umesh Patil, Reinhold Kliegl, and Shravan Vasishth. Parsing costs as predictors of reading difficulty: An evaluation using the Potsdam Sentence Corpus. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 2(1):1-12, 2008. [ code | pdf ]
[49]
Shravan Vasishth, Sven Bruessow, Richard L. Lewis, and Heiner Drenhaus. Processing Polarity: How the ungrammatical intrudes on the grammatical. Cognitive Science, 32(4), 2008. [ code | pdf ]
[50]
Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth, and Julie Van Dyke. Computational principles of working memory in sentence comprehension. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10(10):447-454, 2006. [ pdf ]
[51]
Mineharu Nakayama, Shravan Vasishth, and Richard Lewis. Difficulty of Certain Sentence Constructions in Comprehension. In M. Nakayama, R. Mazuka, Y. Shirai, and P. Li, editors, East Asian Psycholinguistics. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
[52]
Shravan Vasishth and Richard L. Lewis. Argument-head distance and processing complexity: Explaining both locality and antilocality effects. Language, 82(4):767-794, 2006. [ code | pdf ]
[53]
Shravan Vasishth and Richard L. Lewis. Human language processing: Symbolic models. In Keith Brown, editor, Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, volume 5, pages 410-419. Elsevier, 2006. [ .pdf ]
[54]
Richard L. Lewis and Shravan Vasishth. An activation-based model of sentence processing as skilled memory retrieval. Cognitive Science, 29:1-45, May 2005. [ code | pdf ]
[55]
Shravan Vasishth. Quantifying processing difficulty in human language processing. In Rama Kant Agnihotri and Tista Bagchi, editors, Book title not available yet. Sage Publishers, New Delhi, 2005. [ .pdf ]
[56]
S. Vasishth. Discourse context and word order preferences in Hindi. Yearbook of South Asian Languages, pages 113-127, 2004. [ .pdf ]
[57]
Shravan Vasishth. Word order, negation, and negative polarity in Hindi. Research on Language and Computation, 3, 2002. [ .pdf ]
unpublished manuscripts
[1]
Bruno Nicenboim, Felix Engelmann, Katja Suckow, and Shravan Vasishth. Number interference in German: Evidence for cue-based retrieval. submitted to Cognitive Science. [ .pdf ]
[2]
Felix Engelmann, Lena A. Jäger, and Shravan Vasishth. The effect of prominence and cue association in retrieval processes: A computational account. Manuscript submitted (4 December 2016), 2016. [ pdf ]
[3]
Bruno Nicenboim and Shravan Vasishth. Models of retrieval in sentence comprehension: A computational evaluation using Bayesian hierarchical modeling. submitted to Journal of Memory and Language, 2016. [ pdf ]
[4]
Douglas Bates, Reinhold Kliegl, Shravan Vasishth, and Harald Baayen. Parsimonious mixed models. ArXiv e-print, 2015. [ http ]
[5]
Fuyun Wu, Elsi Kaiser, and Shravan Vasishth. Effects of early cues on the processing of Chinese relative clauses: Evidence for experience-based theories. Submitted to Cognitive Science, 2015.

proceedings (2015-2016)
[1]
Samar Husain and Shravan Vasishth. Processing Hindi relative clauses: Evidence against expectation-based theories. In Proceedings of the 29th Annual CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page n/a, Florida, USA, 2016.
[2]
Lena Jäger, Felix Engelmann, and Shravan Vasishth. Interference effects in sentence comprehension: A synthesis. In Proceedings of the AMLaP Conference, Bilbao, Spain, 2016.
[3]
Anna Laurinavichyute, Aleksandra Simdianova, and Shravan Vasishth. Agreement attraction in person. In Proceedings of the AMLaP Conference, Bilbao, Spain, 2016.
[4]
Anna Laurinavichyute and Shravan Vasishth. Agreement attraction in person is symmetric. In 29th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing (Gainesville, FL: University of Florida), 2016.
[5]
Daniela Mertzen, Lena Jäger, and Shravan Vasishth. German relative clauses: The missing-VP effect in double and triple embeddings. In Proceedings of the 29th Annual CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page n/a, Florida, USA, 2016.
[6]
Bruno Nicenboim, Felix Engelmann, Katja Suckow, and Shravan Vasishth. Number interference as predicted by cue-based retrieval. In Proceedings of the AMLaP Conference, Bilbao, Spain, 2016.
[7]
Dario Paape, Barbara Hemforth, and Shravan Vasishth. Ellipsis with garden-path antecedents in French. In Proceedings of the 29th Annual CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page n/a, Florida, USA, 2016.
[8]
Dario Paape, Barbara Hemforth, and Shravan Vasishth. Ellipsis with garden-path antecedents in French. In Proceedings of the AMLaP Conference, Bilbao, Spain, 2016.
[9]
Molood Sadat Safavi, Samar Husain, and Shravan Vasishth. Dependency resolution difficulty increases with distance in Persian complex predicates: Evidence against the expectation-based account. In Proceedings of the 29th Annual CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page n/a, Florida, USA, 2016.
[10]
Molood Sadat Safavi, Samar Husain, and Shravan Vasishth. Expectation-based and memory-based accounts in Persian Complex Predicates. In Proceedings of the AMLaP Conference, Bilbao, Spain, 2016.
[11]
Felix Engelmann, Lena Jäger, and Shravan Vasishth. Cue confusion and distractor prominence explain inconsistent effects of retrieval interference in human sentence processing. In Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling, ICCM, Groningen, NL, 2015. University of Groningen.
[12]
Felix Engelmann, Lena Jäger, and Shravan Vasishth. Cue confusion and distractor prominence explain inconsistent interference effects. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[13]
Samar Husain and Shravan Vasishth. Non-projectivity and processing constraints: Insights from Hindi. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Dependency Linguistics, pages 141-150, Uppsala, Sweden, 2015. [ .pdf ]
[14]
Baris Kahraman, Kentaro Nakatani, Shravan Vasishth, and Yuki Hirose. Does expectation facilitate? A study of NPI dependencies in Turkish. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[15]
Bruno Nicenboim, Felix Engelmann, Katja Suckow, and Shravan Vasishth. Fail fast or succeed slowly: Good-enough processing can mask interference effects. In International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM), Groningen, NL, 2015.
[16]
Bruno Nicenboim, Pavel Logacev, Carolina Gattei, and Shravan Vasishth. When high-capacity readers slow down and low-capacity readers speed up: Working memory differences in unbounded dependencies. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[17]
Bruno Nicenboim, Katja Suckow, and Shravan Vasishth. Fail fast or succeed slowly: Good-enough processing can mask interference effects. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[18]
Jens Roeser, Evgeniya Shipova, Shravan Vasishth, and Malte Zimmermann. Locality rules out variable binding in co-reference resolution. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[19]
Molood Sadat Safavi, Shravan Vasishth, and Samar Husain. Locality and expectation in Persian separable complex predicates. In Proceedings of the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.
[20]
Titus von der Malsburg, Shravan Vasishth, Paul Metzner, and Roger Levy. How presentation modality influences reading comprehension. In Elsi Kaiser, Toby Mintz, Roumyana Pancheva, and Jason Zevin, editors, Proceedings of the 28th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2015. University of Southern California. [ .pdf ]
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